What to Know Before Donating to Charity

Charitable donations can be a great way to help people and organizations in need. However, prior to making such contributions, there are certain issues individuals should take into consideration. This brief blog highlights what some of these concerns should be.

Execute Due Diligence

Before signing a check made out to a specific organization, financial experts and business ethics professionals recommend conducting extensive research on said entities. Individuals are advised to discover if the business in question is registered as charitable organization, has experienced any consumer complaints and can clearly demonstrate the programs and services financed by financial donations.

Does The Charity Have Frequent Or Regular Donors?

Many respected charities will draw the attention of numerous donors, as well as some individuals who will make said contributions on a regular basis. Prior to donating to any organization, donors are encouraged to conduct research regarding if said agency can produce a list of regular contributors.

Trust Any Gut Feelings

It might be an old cliché, but the words if it does not feel right, it probably does not ring true. Should a prospective donor feel uneasy about any of the organization’s practices, said individual should probably trust any negative instincts and donate their hard earned money elsewhere.

What Is The Agency’s Defined Mission?

Most reputable charitable organizations adhere to a specific mission, which is an established set of goals said entity aims to meet. These goals are often written in what is known as a mission statement. Said statement is one or two paragraph declaration describing who the organization is, what said entity strives to accomplish, why the charity in question is important to them and how interested parties could help the organization complete said mission. A mission statement should appear on the organization’s website or be found in any promotional literature submitted to prospective donors.

Find Out What Major Business And Government Regulators Are Saying

In most instances, well-known, reputable charities will be recognized and receive positive reviews from major business watchdog agencies and state monitoring entities. Groups such as the Better Business Bureau and various state agencies should know who a said charity is and offer a review of said agency’s activities. Suspicions could be raised if any of the preceding watchdog groups have no knowledge of the charity or offer poor reviews of said entity’s practices.

Originally posted on DrLoriGoreGreen.net on May 13, 2019.

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Constantly Evolving: Weight Gain During Menopause

Women between the ages of 40 and 50 will begin to exhibit changes in their body as it prepares to end their menstrual cycles. Menopause is the time in a woman’s life where they cease menstruation and the ability to reproduce. It is diagnosed officially once a woman has gone 12 months without her period. Just as hormones brought on menstruation, a shift in hormones brings it to an end.

Symptoms of menopause may include: hot flashes and chills, mood changes, weight gain, thinning hair and dry skin, vaginal dryness, and problems with sleep. During this hormonal shift, the body experiences many changes.

Menopause and Weight Gain

When a female begins to go through menopause, it’s not uncommon for them to gain weight. Some believe that the weight is caused by hormonal shifts that mess with metabolism, but this is not the case. Hormonal therapy is almost always given to help balance moods and other unpleasant symptoms, and these supplements also get blamed for middle-aged women being overweight. However, science finds no evidence of any such connections.

As a person begins to age, their metabolism naturally slows. People in their 20’s have an easier time losing weight than that of a person in their 40’s. The fat that has accumulated for many years is very stubborn, and with a body mass decrease, the fat is nearly impossible to lose. To fight the battle of the bulge takes physical activity, but this is the point when most women are ready to settle down and avoid rigorous exercise routines.

A woman in her 40’s or 50’s isn’t typically as physically active as she was in her younger years. With this reduced activity comes a decrease in muscle mass and an increase in weight. However, there may be more to worry about than just a few extra pounds.

While menopause cannot be associated with weight gain, it can be related to a change in the way the body distributes fat. Thus, it affects body composition. Many women change from a pear-shaped body to that of an apple like shape with age. Additional studies are needed to find out exactly how menopause affects body composition. The problem is that most women are overweight by the time they reach this point in their life.

Carrying additional weight around puts a woman at an increased risk for hypertension, osteoarthritis, cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Additionally, her compromised health can cause issues with mobility, self-image, and many other factors. It’s imperative to stay active to be healthy at all ages, but it’s especially important during menopause. A sedentary lifestyle creates too many risks that are not worth taking. Physical Activity is a must.

Originally posted on DrLoriGoreGreen.org on May 13, 2019.

What to Know Before Donating to Charity

Charitable donations can be a great way to help people and organizations in need. However, prior to making such contributions, there are certain issues individuals should take into consideration. This brief blog highlights what some of these concerns should be.

Execute Due Diligence

Before signing a check made out to a specific organization, financial experts and business ethics professionals recommend conducting extensive research on said entities. Individuals are advised to discover if the business in question is registered as charitable organization, has experienced any consumer complaints and can clearly demonstrate the programs and services financed by financial donations.

Does The Charity Have Frequent Or Regular Donors?

Many respected charities will draw the attention of numerous donors, as well as some individuals who will make said contributions on a regular basis. Prior to donating to any organization, donors are encouraged to conduct research regarding if said agency can produce a list of regular contributors.

Trust Any Gut Feelings

It might be an old cliché, but the words if it does not feel right, it probably does not ring true. Should a prospective donor feel uneasy about any of the organization’s practices, said individual should probably trust any negative instincts and donate their hard earned money elsewhere.

What Is The Agency’s Defined Mission?

Most reputable charitable organizations adhere to a specific mission, which is an established set of goals said entity aims to meet. These goals are often written in what is known as a mission statement. Said statement is one or two paragraph declaration describing who the organization is, what said entity strives to accomplish, why the charity in question is important to them and how interested parties could help the organization complete said mission. A mission statement should appear on the organization’s website or be found in any promotional literature submitted to prospective donors.

Find Out What Major Business And Government Regulators Are Saying

In most instances, well-known, reputable charities will be recognized and receive positive reviews from major business watchdog agencies and state monitoring entities. Groups such as the Better Business Bureau and various state agencies should know who a said charity is and offer a review of said agency’s activities. Suspicions could be raised if any of the preceding watchdog groups have no knowledge of the charity or offer poor reviews of said entity’s practices.

from Dr. Lori Gore-Green | Community Service http://bit.ly/2Hhlaq7

Constantly Evolving: Weight Gain During Menopause

Women between the ages of 40 and 50 will begin to exhibit changes in their body as it prepares to end their menstrual cycles. Menopause is the time in a woman’s life where they cease menstruation and the ability to reproduce. It is diagnosed officially once a woman has gone 12 months without her period. Just as hormones brought on menstruation, a shift in hormones brings it to an end.

Symptoms of menopause may include: hot flashes and chills, mood changes, weight gain, thinning hair and dry skin, vaginal dryness, and problems with sleep. During this hormonal shift, the body experiences many changes.

Menopause and Weight Gain

When a female begins to go through menopause, it’s not uncommon for them to gain weight. Some believe that the weight is caused by hormonal shifts that mess with metabolism, but this is not the case. Hormonal therapy is almost always given to help balance moods and other unpleasant symptoms, and these supplements also get blamed for middle-aged women being overweight. However, science finds no evidence of any such connections.

As a person begins to age, their metabolism naturally slows. People in their 20’s have an easier time losing weight than that of a person in their 40’s. The fat that has accumulated for many years is very stubborn, and with a body mass decrease, the fat is nearly impossible to lose. To fight the battle of the bulge takes physical activity, but this is the point when most women are ready to settle down and avoid rigorous exercise routines.

A woman in her 40’s or 50’s isn’t typically as physically active as she was in her younger years. With this reduced activity comes a decrease in muscle mass and an increase in weight. However, there may be more to worry about than just a few extra pounds.

While menopause cannot be associated with weight gain, it can be related to a change in the way the body distributes fat. Thus, it affects body composition. Many women change from a pear-shaped body to that of an apple like shape with age. Additional studies are needed to find out exactly how menopause affects body composition. The problem is that most women are overweight by the time they reach this point in their life.

Carrying additional weight around puts a woman at an increased risk for hypertension, osteoarthritis, cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Additionally, her compromised health can cause issues with mobility, self-image, and many other factors. It’s imperative to stay active to be healthy at all ages, but it’s especially important during menopause. A sedentary lifestyle creates too many risks that are not worth taking. Physical Activity is a must

from Dr. Lori Gore-Green | Gynecology and Obstetrics http://bit.ly/2WFFgj7

Constantly Evolving: Puberty and Menstruation

Constantly evolving is a new series documenting the ways in which women’s bodies change. Based on the time of the month or period of life, the series hopes to highlight the magnificence of the woman’s body.  

The previous “Constantly Evolving” article focused on external physical changes girls experience when going through puberty. In conjunction to evolutions in physical appearance, the female body undergoes a massive change internally with the start of ovulation and menstruation.

When girls are born their ovaries contain thousands of eggs called ova. During puberty, the ovaries begin to release estrogen and progesterone leading the lining of the uterus to become thicker.

Simultaneously, the hormones mature an egg and release it from the ovary. The egg travels through the fallopian tube and eventually reaches the uterus. This process is known as ovulation.

This lining of the uterus builds up in preparation for a fertilized egg, which would attach itself to the lining and begin developing. If there is no fertilized egg, the uterus sheds its thick lining and bleeds. The shedding of the uterus is what we call menstruation. This process then repeats month to month.

Girls most often get their periods for the first time between 9 and 14 years of age. Menstruation is often linked to weight, so many girls will not get their period until they exceed 90 pounds. If menstruation hasn’t begun by age 16, seeing a doctor is recommended. Periods may be irregular at first. With time, they begin to fall into a pattern that is easy to track and predict.

Periods can last anywhere from three to seven days. Some pain and discomfort is common, as the uterus is expanding and contracting to shed its lining. Pain can vary in severity, with some girls experiencing extreme cramping and back pain while others only find the cramps annoying. These variances are often caused by the level of prostaglandins the body releases. If experiencing severe cramps that interfere with daily life, girls should speak to their doctors to determine the cause.

Though information about menstruation is readily available, studies show that many women felt unprepared, shocked, and confused when they got their first period. The Constantly Evolving series strives to shine a light on the beauty of the female body and all the changes it endures to create and support new life. Sex education, as well as open communication about puberty, is necessary to break down stigmas and enhance appreciation for the female body.

from Dr. Lori Gore-Green | Gynecology and Obstetrics http://bit.ly/2V4ziLo

Constantly Evolving: Puberty and Menstruation

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Constantly evolving is a new series documenting the ways in which women’s bodies change. Based on the time of the month or period of life, the series hopes to highlight the magnificence of the woman’s body.  

The previous “Constantly Evolving” article focused on external physical changes girls experience when going through puberty. In conjunction to evolutions in physical appearance, the female body undergoes a massive change internally with the start of ovulation and menstruation.

When girls are born their ovaries contain thousands of eggs called ova. During puberty, the ovaries begin to release estrogen and progesterone leading the lining of the uterus to become thicker.

Simultaneously, the hormones mature an egg and release it from the ovary. The egg travels through the fallopian tube and eventually reaches the uterus. This process is known as ovulation.

This lining of the uterus builds up in preparation for a fertilized egg, which would attach itself to the lining and begin developing. If there is no fertilized egg, the uterus sheds its thick lining and bleeds. The shedding of the uterus is what we call menstruation. This process then repeats month to month.

Girls most often get their periods for the first time between 9 and 14 years of age. Menstruation is often linked to weight, so many girls will not get their period until they exceed 90 pounds. If menstruation hasn’t begun by age 16, seeing a doctor is recommended. Periods may be irregular at first. With time, they begin to fall into a pattern that is easy to track and predict.

Periods can last anywhere from three to seven days. Some pain and discomfort is common, as the uterus is expanding and contracting to shed its lining. Pain can vary in severity, with some girls experiencing extreme cramping and back pain while others only find the cramps annoying. These variances are often caused by the level of prostaglandins the body releases. If experiencing severe cramps that interfere with daily life, girls should speak to their doctors to determine the cause.

Though information about menstruation is readily available, studies show that many women felt unprepared, shocked, and confused when they got their first period. The Constantly Evolving series strives to shine a light on the beauty of the female body and all the changes it endures to create and support new life. Sex education, as well as open communication about puberty, is necessary to break down stigmas and enhance appreciation for the female body.

This post was originally published on DrLoriGoreGreen.org on April 17, 2019. 

Shop Meaningfully: 3 Companies That Support Women

Shop Meaningfully_ 3 Companies That Support Women _ Dr. Lori Gore-Green

In 2018, the amount of female CEOs for Fortune 500 companies topped out at only 24. Though women are making great strides towards pay equality and representation in the corporate world, there are still large and looming gaps in the market. So, how do we, as consumers and women, demonstrate the desire for and power of female entrepreneurs and business leaders? We direct our money towards companies that support women or are run by women. Here are three great companies with female-centric ideals and leaders to add to your shopping list.

One for Women

“One small gesture. One big impact.” That’s One for Women’s mission statement, and it’s one they take seriously. Founded by Heidi Crable and her daughter, Meg Wheeler, this company strives to create the perfectly curated gift set for any and all of life’s moments—good or bad, happy or sad.

One for Women also donates a portion of their profits to non-profit charities, many of which are focused on women’s and children’s causes. They have previously partnered with Every Mother Counts, the Fireborn Institute, and She’s the First.

Nudest

Women of color have long fought for representation within the beauty industry’s offerings. While this gap has recently shown improvement, many black women still face challenges when shopping for makeup. The problem? When shopping online, women of color face heightened barriers to find their match thanks to poorly named shades, such as the “universal” tone “nude.”

Founded by Atima Lui, the daughter of a Sudanese refugee and black activist, Nudest uses Artificial Intelligence to help women find their perfect matches when shopping online. The innovative technology was created by underrepresented minorities.

Billie

Female personal care items are, on average, 13% more costly than similar products for men, and razors are no exception. In store, a pack of pink razors will cost approximately a dollar more than a pack of men’s green razors. The difference between the two? Nothing but the cost and the color. This upcharge is known to consumers as the “Pink Tax,” which is not an actual tax, but instead refers to the price inflation of women’s products.

Billie, a shaving subscription service, seeks to break the “pink tax.” Offering adorably packaged and designed razors and shaving products, the company prices their goods at values comparable to men’s shaving subscriptions. Billie is also the first company of their kind to showcase body hair in their advertisements and work to promote body hair positivity. Additionally, one percent of their revenue goes directly to women’s causes worldwide.

Though there are not nearly enough women on the Fortune 500 list of CEOs, women all around the world are running incredibly creative and innovative companies. Focusing your money and attention on them helps support women and create more opportunities for female growth. Shop meaningfully and intelligently by researching brands and supporting the ones whose ideals match yours.

This post was originally published on DrLoriGoreGreen.net on April 17, 2019.