Category Archives: gynecologist

Postpartum Fitness Tips

A common question among new mothers is how long after giving birth can they get back into their pre-pregnancy fitness routine? While you may think you’ll be able to quickly get back to the way you lived before being pregnant after you give birth, you may want to think again. After giving birth you may suffer from bad posture, general fatigue, and an achy body amongst other things. This means doing many common activities you did before pregnancy, such as exercising, may be difficult to adjust to for a bit. The pregnant body takes around 40 weeks to form, and in some cases, it can take almost as long as that to get completely back to your pre-pregnancy body. At the end of the day, your doctor will let you know when you’re okay to start working out again, but when you do begin it’s important you approach it safely. Here are a few tips to help you out in postpartum fitness.

 

Ease Into It

It’s important that you take your time when getting back into your fitness routine. Pushing yourself too much so soon after birth can actually threaten your overall recovery. Many doctors will recommend that you avoid exerting yourself for about 2 weeks after giving birth. After that, a good way to start is by taking a 5-minute walk and seeing how you feel.  As long as you feel okay and there isn’t any bleeding or aching, you’re likely fine to take a slightly longer walk the next day and continue slowly building how long your walks are over time. After you build this up for about 2 weeks, you can move into gentle upper-body stretching or even take a postpartum exercise class.

 

Be Careful If Breastfeeding

Not every mother breastfeeds but if you are and you want to get back into fitness, it’s important you’re even more careful than usual. Weight loss shouldn’t be as much of a concern the first few weeks after giving birth until you’ve built up a stable milk supply. Some of the weight will naturally disappear during the first few days due to your body relishing the extra fluids it needed while pregnant. It’s also important you eat correctly if working out and breastfeeding, as breastfeeding mothers need an additional 500 calories a day than non-breastfeeding mothers.

 

Get Plenty of Rest

Getting rest and not overexerting yourself is more important than ever after having a baby. It’s easy to become sleep-deprived after having a baby, especially if your baby is waking up multiple times throughout the night, not letting you get a full night’s sleep. If this is the case, it’s important that you’re careful about overworking yourself. Exercise does have the potential to provide you with more energy but if your body is already lacking then it’s more likely it will just add to your exhaustion.

This article was originally published on DrLoriGore-Green.com

The Cause Behind Brown Discharge Before a Period

When you see brown discharge, you may feel distressed. But no worries, brown discharge is usually harmless and there are many reasons why it may happen in the first place. Sometimes brown discharge can be an indication of pregnancy or perimenopause. Very rarely is brown discharge an indication of an underlying health condition.

Below we will look at the various causes for brown discharge and when it is time to see a doctor.

What is Brown Discharge?

Women have vaginal discharge on a relatively normal basis. Usually, vaginal discharge is thin and clear or white in color. When the vaginal discharge is brown it indicates that there is a small amount of old blood. If there is blood still in the uterus and it takes a longer time to come out, it may be brown.

Non-Pregnant Women

If you have brown discharge while you are not pregnant you may be experiencing the start of your period just at a lighter flow or ovulation spotting. You may also be having a reaction to a Pap smear test or a reaction to having sex.

Pregnant Women

If you happen to be pregnant, pink or brown discharge is sometimes an early sign of pregnancy. Not every pregnant woman will experince this symptom, but it does occur in a few women. The discharge occurs due to implantation bleeding. The bleeding may occur one to two weeks after the egg has been fertilized. Brown discharge during your pregnancy isn’t anything to be concerned over, but if the discharge is a dark brown, be sure to speak with a doctor.

Approaching Menopause

For women who are approaching their 40s or 50s and experiencing brown discharge before their period, it may be a sign of perimenopause. Perimenopause is a transition period that happens before menopause begins. Along with brown discharge, women may be experiencing mood swings, hot flushes, night sweats, a hard time sleeping, and vaginal dryness.

Serious Causes of Brown Discharge

There are a few other more serious causes of brown discharge and can occur at any age and will be accompanied by other symptoms. Pelvic inflammatory disease, a sexually transmitted disease, a retained foreign body (tampons, condoms, vaginal contraceptive sponges, diaphragms, etc.), polycystic ovary syndrome, and cervical cancer.

When to See a Doctor

As mentioned before, brown discharge isn’t something you usually have to worry about. Although it can be a symptom of something more serious, it won’t require you to go to the doctor. However, if you are experiencing brown discharge that continues for several weeks, happens after sex, smells bad, is accompanied by pain, cramping, or vaginal itching.

from Dr. Lori Gore-Green | Gynecology and Obstetrics https://ift.tt/2tbjRox

What Is Amenorrhea?

A woman’s menstrual cycle is stressful enough without complications. However, there are many factors that can interrupt or change a regular cycle. Here’s what you need to know about what amenorrhea is, how it’s caused, and its treatments. The more knowledge you have about it’s causes, symptoms, and treatments, the more prepared you’ll be if it happens to you. 

Put simply, amenorrhea is the absence of menstrual bleeding in a woman who is of reproductive age. There are two different types of this condition, primary and secondary amenorrhea. Primary amenorrhea occurs when girls over age 15 have never had their period. Secondary amenorrhea occurs when a woman who previously had regular periods does not menstruate for over six months. 

Causes and Risk Factors

There are a variety of factors than can contribute to the onset of this condition, including:

  • Obesity
  • Less than 17% body fat
  • Leptin deficiencies
  • Polycystic ovarian syndrome
  • Overactive thyroid glands
  • Extreme emotional distress
  • Excessive exercise
  • The use of some contraceptives
  • The use of some medications
  • Chemotherapy or radiation treatments
  • Scar tissue in the uterus
  • Genetic defects

Symptoms of Amenorrhea

While the main symptom is the lack of a period, there are other factors that can occur. If you think you may have this condition, consult with a doctor for diagnosis and treatment. The following symptoms may occur due to amenorrhea:

  • Weight gain or loss
  • Changes in breast size
  • Milky discharge from breasts
  • Acne
  • Hair loss
  • Increase in facial hair growth
  • Headaches and vision changes
  • Pelvic pain

Diagnosis and Treatment

Consulting a doctor should always be the first step whenever you feel you have a condition or illness. Be open and honest about your symptoms so they can properly determine the condition, cause, and then prescribe a treatment plan. Doctors and medical professionals will typically perform tests to check hormone levels or genetic markers and may perform pelvic ultrasounds, MRIs, or a CT scan. 

Treatment will depend entirely upon the root cause of amenorrhea, but may include medication, surgery, lifestyle changes, or a combination of several. Taking steps to achieve and maintain a healthy weight may be a suggestion if obesity or low body fat is a cause. Medical treatments could include a change in birth control, estrogen replacement therapy, or removal of scar tissue.

from Dr. Lori Gore-Green | Gynecology and Obstetrics https://ift.tt/2QAyNnT

Heartwarming Ways to Volunteer During the Holidays

During the holiday season, it can be easy to get wrapped up in the hustle and bustle of your own shopping list. Unfortunately, not everyone is in the same position, and many people across the world often struggle during the holiday time. This holiday season, be giving of your time, and help out those in need. For a few ideas to spread holiday cheer, keep reading!

Sponsor a Family in Need

With Family-to-family.org, you can help provide a family with a holiday meal who may not have the means to do. To make more of an impact, get more people involved. Ask the people in your life, your family, friend, coworkers, to put together a few holiday dinner baskets. By everyone coming together, you can make four or five baskets in no time!

Give a Hand to the Homeless 

Family gatherings in warm and cozy homes are particularly common during the holidays and can make the homeless feel left out and isolated. Providing a helping hand to the homeless starts with partnering up with the National Coalition for the Homeless. This organization provides ample opportunities for you to combat homelessness. Volunteering at food shelters, building homes, or offering job training all help out the homeless and make them feel a little less alone this holiday season.

Give a Gift to Toys for Tots

Since 1947, Toys for Tots has distributed over 566 million toys to children across the United States. Add to this growing number and continue to deliver a message of hope by contributing a few gifts to this wonderful charity. This is a great way to give back if you are short on time but still want to help. You can donate directly online, or you find a local campaign in your area and drop off a toy or two.

Host a Coat Drive

Along with the holidays comes with cold weather. Those in the North can experience really harsh weather, where a coat is absolutely necessary to get through the winter. Hosting a coat drive is a massive project to take on by yourself, so you may want to recruit a few friends, or introduce the idea to your office. You’ll find that many of your local shelters will be more than willing to pair up and distribute the coats to those in need.

from Dr. Lori Gore-Green | Community Service https://ift.tt/2QNP9v1

What is an Ectopic Pregnancy?

The female body is beautiful and extremely complex. Pregnancy can be very tricky and come with many complications. There are also rare and complicated pregnancies every woman should be aware of. Although many women have heard of an ectopic pregnancy, not many of them understand what it is exactly. It’s important for every woman to know and understand what it is, how common it is, and what it does to the body:

What Is It?

Common pregnancies carry the fetus in the uterus. When a woman has an ectopic pregnancy, the fertilized egg attaches itself to a place other than inside the uterus. Most of the time an ectopic pregnancy will involve a fertilized egg found in the fallopian tubes. Since the fallopian tubes are not designed to carry out a pregnancy, it can not develop properly and must be removed as soon as possible.

 

What Causes This?

A fertilized egg attaching to anywhere but a uterus sounds bizarre, which is why many women want to understand why this happens and what causes it. There are many causes that can lead to ectopic pregnancy. An infection or inflammation in the fallopian tube can cause it to become partially or entirely blocked, leading to an ectopic pregnancy. Other causes include scar tissue from a previous infection or a surgical procedure on the tubes or pelvic area and abnormal growths or a birth defect can result in an abnormality in the tube’s shape.

 

What are the Symptoms?

There are some symptoms an ectopic pregnancy shares with a normal uterine pregnancy, such as nausea and breast soreness. Symptoms that differ from a uterine pregnancy are sharp waves of pain in the abdomen, pelvis, shoulder, or neck and light to heavy vaginal spotting or bleeding. Other symptoms of an ectopic pregnancy include dizziness or fainting and rectal pressure. If a woman experiences any or all of these symptoms, they must seek medical attention immediately. 

 

What are the Risks?

There are certain factors that can put a woman at risk of having an ectopic pregnancy. If a woman is between the ages of 35-44 while trying to conceive, her risk is much greater. If a woman has had an ectopic pregnancy before, several abortions, or is a smoker, she is also at great risk. Women with Endometriosis or Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) have a greater potential of having an ectopic pregnancy as well.

from Dr. Lori Gore-Green | Gynecology and Obstetrics https://ift.tt/2BJzZy5

What is an Ectopic Pregnancy?

The female body is beautiful and extremely complex. Pregnancy can be very tricky and come with many complications. There are also rare and complicated pregnancies every woman should be aware of. Although many women have heard of an ectopic pregnancy, not many of them understand what it is exactly. It’s important for every woman to know and understand what it is, how common it is, and what it does to the body:

What Is It?

Common pregnancies carry the fetus in the uterus. When a woman has an ectopic pregnancy, the fertilized egg attaches itself to a place other than inside the uterus. Most of the time an ectopic pregnancy will involve a fertilized egg found in the fallopian tubes. Since the fallopian tubes are not designed to carry out a pregnancy, it can not develop properly and must be removed as soon as possible.

What Causes This?

A fertilized egg attaching to anywhere but a uterus sounds bizarre, which is why many women want to understand why this happens and what causes it. There are many causes that can lead to ectopic pregnancy. An infection or inflammation in the fallopian tube can cause it to become partially or entirely blocked, leading to an ectopic pregnancy. Other causes include scar tissue from a previous infection or a surgical procedure on the tubes or pelvic area and abnormal growths or a birth defect can result in an abnormality in the tube’s shape.

What are the Symptoms?

There are some symptoms an ectopic pregnancy shares with a normal uterine pregnancy, such as nausea and breast soreness. Symptoms that differ from a uterine pregnancy are sharp waves of pain in the abdomen, pelvis, shoulder, or neck and light to heavy vaginal spotting or bleeding. Other symptoms of an ectopic pregnancy include dizziness or fainting and rectal pressure. If a woman experiences any or all of these symptoms, they must seek medical attention immediately.

What are the Risks?

There are certain factors that can put a woman at risk of having an ectopic pregnancy. If a woman is between the ages of 35-44 while trying to conceive, her risk is much greater. If a woman has had an ectopic pregnancy before, several abortions, or is a smoker, she is also at great risk. Women with Endometriosis or Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) have a greater potential of having an ectopic pregnancy as well.

Common Causes of Menstrual Irregularities

No two menstrual cycles are alike. Every woman’s body is different, therefore every woman will experience their own different cycle. Although women often share similar period symptoms, each cycle is unique. However, sometimes a cycle can be so different that it can be irregular. There are many causes for menstrual irregularities every woman should be made aware of:

Pregnancy

The most common cause of menstrual irregularities is pregnancy. Pregnancy puts a woman’s period to a halt for nine months after conception. There may be a bit of light spotting, but this is a common sign a woman may be pregnant. Other symptoms are nausea, breast soreness, and fatigue.

Birth Control

Another way to cause menstrual irregularities is by taking birth control. Hormonal birth control pills and hormone-containing intrauterine devices (IUDs) can cause irregular bleeding during a woman’s cycle. An IUD can also cause very heavy bleeding.

Perimenopause

As a woman get older, her body begins to go through major changes. When her period stops due to her age, this is called menopause. The time between their period coming to a stop and entering menopause is called perimenopause. This can cause them to have a very irregular period, sometimes going months without bleeding. Women can also experience hot flashes, mood changes, difficulty sleeping, and vaginal dryness.

Being Overweight

It’s important for men and women to stay healthy. Being overweight can cause many health issues. For women, it can lead to menstrual irregularities. When a woman is overweight, their obesity impacts hormone and insulin levels and interferes with your menstrual cycle.

Eating Disorders and Extreme Weightloss

It’s important for your body to find a healthy balance. Obesity isn’t the only weight issue that can lead to an unhealthy menstrual cycle. If a woman has an eating disorder or is experiencing extreme and rapid weight loss, it can interfere with their body producing the hormones needed for ovulation.

Stress

Mental health can have a major impact on the body. For women, stress can be a major factor when dealing with menstrual irregularities. Research has found that stress can interfere with a woman’s menstrual cycle by temporarily obstructing the part of the brain in charge of controlling the hormones responsible for regulating your cycle.

How Volunteering Can Impact Your Wellness

Without a doubt, volunteering makes a positive and lasting impact on any community. It gives you a chance to make an immeasurable difference in the lives of many people and is something anyone can do regardless of age, income, or the skills a person possesses. While the facts about the effects volunteering can have on a community are well known, the facts regarding how it can impact an individual’s wellbeing and wellness aren’t quite as widespread. Take a look below to see how volunteering positively impacts each aspect of your wellness. 

Decreased Risk of Depression

The act of volunteering helps others lead healthier, more meaningful lives which can impact our mental health to a large degree. The connections you make while volunteering and the social interaction volunteering provides have been shown to decrease the risk of depression. The act of spreading goodwill and doing something selfless can also lead to a happier overall outlook on life. 

Staying Active

Studies conducted by John Hopkins University discovered that volunteering increased participants’ brain function. Volunteering takes a lot of thought and coordination, which keeps your brain active. The benefits definitely don’t stop there for your body. Volunteering typically involves a lot of movement, which translates into physical activity. Any activity that gets you up and moving in a healthy manner will increase your physical wellness. 

Stress Reduction

The physical aspects of volunteering reduce the effects of stress hormones in the body and help to eliminate any anxious and stressful feelings. In addition, the sense of meaning and fulfillment of the work you conduct helps to alleviate any stress due to increased dopamine levels in your system. Helping others releases chemicals in your brain that increase your happiness, so the more you help others and find joy and fulfillment in the work, the happier you will become!

Increases Self-Confidence

Doing good for others naturally provides you with a sense of accomplishment. Your role in making an impact on someone’s life can also boost your sense of pride and even your identity. The better you feel about your accomplishments, the better your outlook on life and yourself will be. 

from Dr. Lori Gore-Green | Community Service https://ift.tt/2nmXOYT

The Future of Fundraising

Technological advancements are changing the ways that people interact and do business. The charitable sector is no exception to this, and charities and donors need to stay on top of the most recent developments to maximize their fundraising efforts. Given all these rapid changes, fundraising techniques and actual giving methods are evolving. This is hardly an exhaustive list, but it examines a few of the up and coming trends in the giving landscape

Cryptocurrency

The charitable sector saw the power of cryptocurrency in late 2017 and early 2018. Different startups and philanthropists have made significant donations worth millions of dollars  in digital currency. There are cryptocurrencies developed for use specifically in the sector, like Donationcoin. This allows for instant transfers without third-party processing fees, providing a cost-saving advantage for donors. UNICEF’s approach to cryptocurrency was a little different but unique: their program Game Chaingers recruited gamers to mine a currency called Ethereum, with the resulting funds supporting relief efforts in Syria. In essence, this enabled the gaming community to donate without giving money. 

Virtual Reality

Different sectors have been embracing virtual reality (VR) for its ability to create immersive experiences, and it’s no surprise that the technology is making its way into the charitable sector too. According to a 2017 Facebook report, 48% of individuals who viewed VR content from charities are likely to donate to the given cause, and they are also likely to give more. “VR is an effective tool for fundraising given its ability to put people in others’ shoes,” writes the Better Business Bureau’s Spring 2018 Wise Giving Guide. The organization charity:water hosted a fundraiser in December of 2015 and provided guests with VR headsets that virtually transported them to Ethiopia. In demonstrating the fundraising potential of VR, charity:water received more donations than anticipated with $2.4 million in donor commitments. 

Social Media

Love it or hate it, Facebook has been a powerful tool in the nonprofit toolbox. The platform can be used for fundraising in addition to volunteer recruitment and spreading brand awareness. Facebook started allowing its users to set up fundraisers for nonprofits, which streamlined the giving experience. Furthermore, Facebook has, in a sense, made peer-to-peer fundraising easier as well. 

from Dr. Lori Gore-Green | Community Service https://ift.tt/2z9Dc94

What is Postpartum Depression

Childbirth can be an emotional experience for new parents. As you settle in with your bundle of joy, you might encounter something unexpected – depression. Postpartum depression is often left undiscussed but affects many parents. What separates this from postpartum “baby blues”? Sometimes a rare but more severe condition called postpartum psychosis can develop. 

Defining Postpartum Depression

By definition by the National Institute of Mental Health, postpartum depression is a mood disorder that can affect women and birthing parents after childbirth. New parents often experience “baby blues” after childbirth, where they might experience mood swings, crying spells, anxiety, and difficulty sleeping. The symptoms of postpartum depression may be similar but tend to be more severe and last longer, sometimes interfering with your ability to care for your baby and complete other daily tasks.  

Symptoms

Parents can experience depressed mood or severe mood swings, excessive crying, and difficulty bonding with their baby. Other common symptoms include changes in appetite, social withdrawal, and sleep disturbances. Symptoms will usually begin within the first few weeks after giving birth but may begin earlier (during pregnancy) or later, up to a year after birth. More severe symptoms may occur, such as thoughts of harming oneself or the baby, and these require serious and immediate attention. 

Causes

Physical changes and emotional issues play a role in postpartum depression, but there is no single cause for the condition. Hormonal changes after childbirth, such as dramatic drops in levels of progesterone and estrogen, may contribute to postpartum depression. Your risk of developing postpartum depression may increase if you have a history of depression or other mood disorders.

Treatments

Fortunately, postpartum depression is treatable.Treatment and recovery time will vary depending on your individual needs and the severity of the depression. Your medical provider will work on treating the underlying causes and may refer you to a mental health professional. Generally, treatment for depression includes psychotherapy, medication, or both. It is important to continue treatment even after you begin to feel better, as stopping treatment too early may lead to relapse.  Left untreated, postpartum depression can last for many months or longer. 

from Dr. Lori Gore-Green | Gynecology and Obstetrics https://ift.tt/31S3hpE